circleavatar512.png

WRITING STORIES WITH MONSTERS


Kill Screen

Kill Screen

 

DO GAME DESIGNERS ACTUALLY NEED TO GO TO SCHOOL?

I suspect half of the community at IndieCade is made up of academics: students and professors that believe in a formal way of teaching and creating games. The other half is made up of rogue developers that make games because they have a natural talent. After three days of playing and discussing games at IndieCade East, it’s hard not to notice the divergence between these two communities. Many of the indie games shown were made by developers with little or no education, yet the muscle behind IndieCade is a parade of degrees. So is a formal education necessary or not?

 

ITALIAN TEAM HOPES TO FIND DIGITAL MEANING IN VIDEOGAME RIOT SIMULATOR

In 2011, Time Magazine awarded “The Protester” their “Person of the Year” award stating, “All over the world, the protesters of 2011 share a belief that their countries’ political systems and economies have grown dysfunctional and corrupt.” Lost in translations is the human element behind the groups fighting for their freedom. What does it feel like to ignite a riot or be asked to suppress it? 

 

AN NYU PROFESSOR EXPLAINS WHY FAILING AT VIDEOGAMES MAKES US UNHAPPY

Like an athlete sobbing after a championship loss, Jesper Juul hates failing in videogames. “Why do we play videogames even though they make us unhappy?” he asks in his new book The Art of Failure: An Essay on the Pain of Playing Videogames. Comparing game failure to tragic literature, theatre, and cinema, Juul looks at why failing in videogames is so personal and why it’s okay to get angry when we do.

 

STORY WAR TESTS YOUR ABILITY TO TELL TALES, NOT YOUR STRENGTH

As a father, and a writer, my appreciation for a game like this lies in the environment it creates to tell stories. As they grow older, I want my children to use their imagination and not be trapped by logic (a sound tool their father profusely uses to win arguments). What close-minded scientist declared that if you see an alternate version of yourself while time traveling that all is lost? Maybe we can use this to our advantage? A game like Story War fosters these types of open-ended discussion.

 

FACELESS BREATHES NEW FEAR INTO OLD STORIES

For ten years in Calvin and Hobbes, Bill Watterson captured a terrifying childhood ritual. Nightly, Calvin dialogued with the monsters under his bed about their existence.

“Are there any monsters under my bed tonight?” he’d ask, only to hear in reply, “Of course not. Come and see for yourself.” from somewhere underneath the bed. Calvin lacked the facts, and without them, consistently stayed up all night with his best friend Hobbes, bloodshot and terrified of ghosts, the bogeyman, and other creatures they could only venture a guess on whether they existed or not.

Faceless would have terrified Calvin.

 

Love, NYC

Love, NYC